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To Raise, Love, and Lose a Black Child: The Life and Death of Jordan Davis

In this I heard the essential problem of 21st-century black philosophy. Black people are a minority in the country they built. The legacy of that building has remanded them to the basement of America. There are only two conscious ways to escape the basement: (1) Appeal to the magnanimity of white people. (2) Become super-human. The first option is degrading and demoralizing, in that concedes the possibility of not being human. Whatever can be said of the nonviolent protests of the ’60s, they rejected a right that Americans cherish in all their myths and histories: the right of self-defense. The appeal essentially says, “We will be human when you allow it.”

The second option—being twice as good—is impossible as a reality. And, to paraphrase Michelle Alexander, this is not because there is something wrong or special about black people, but because we are, like everyone else, ultimately human. Indeed, the notion that 40 million people will prove themselves “twice as good” as some other million is the opposite of humanism. Perhaps “twice as good” works as a kind of religion—a personal inspiration for those of us who cannot bring themselves to say, “We will be human when they allow it.”

(Source: snark0lepsy, via kadeesaa)

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(Source: supnikita, via kingmoyo)